Articles

“Never Again the Everyday”: On Cinema, Colportage and the Pedagogical Possibilities of Escapism.

Taking my own, as well as students, experience of escapism into TV series as a starting point, that is, their ability take us somewhere far away, something which has become more acute during the pandemic time since we remain more or less self-isolated because of the corona virus Covid-19, the article discusses escapism in relation to distraction and attention in life as well as within teaching, but also in relation to colportage, hope and social justice. According to Ernst Bloch, social justice cannot materialize without regarding things differently. Something that is often dismissed as mere escapism might be a seed for a new and more humane social order, as it can be seen as an “immature, but honest substitute for revolution” (Bloch 1986, p. 368). Drawing on Bloch’s understanding of colportage and hope, as well as Walter Benjamin’s understanding of mass culture and cinema, the article treats escapism and TV series not as something simple, but rather as possible seeds for a new social order and thus as having pedagogical possibilities (Hållander, 2020).

Published online and open access in Studies in Philosophy and Education (2021). A part of the special issue on Cinema, Philosophy and Education with guest editors Torill Strand and Claudia Schumann.

ON THE VERGE OF TEARS: THE AMBIVALENT SPACES OF EMOTIONS AND TESTIMONIES

What do emotions do? Are emotions possible and desirable starting points for teaching difficult and complex subjects such as injustice and historical wounds? This article explores the 2015 image and testimony of Alan Kurdi, lying on a beach of the Mediterranean Sea and the immense emotional response it elicited from the media. By critiquing emotions based on testimonies in teaching, by primarily following Ahmed (2014) and Todd (2003), this article argues that emotions are cultural practices, not psychological states, and, thus, are relational. On this point, the argument is developed into two different movements, first, the effects offered by listening; second, opacity in relation to transparency, based on the thoughts of Glissant (1997). The article is a developed version of a chapter in Det omöjliga vittnandet (Eskaton, 2017). Published online: Studies in Philosophy and Education, September 2019, Volume 38, Issue 5, pp 467–480.

SHIFTING FEMINIST POLITICS IN EDUCATION: CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES: SPECIAL ISSUE FOR STUDIER I PÆDAGOGISK FILOSOFI

I have been guest editor together with Claudia Schumann for the special issue: “Shifting feminist politics in education: Contemporary philosophical perspectives”, for the journal Studier i pedagogisk filosofi. I and Claudia have written the introductionContributions from Karin Gunnarsson and Simon Ceder, Aislinn O’Donnell, Rebecca Adami, Lovisa Bergdahl and Claudia Schumann. The whole issue can be read online, for free. I also contribute with the article: “Inhabiting a Place in the Common: Profanation and Biopolitics in Teaching”.

TESTIMONY AND NARRATIVE AS A POLITICAL RELATION: THE QUESTION OF ETHICAL JUDGEMENT IN EDUCATION

With the starting point in the film 12 Angry Men the article discussess testimony, narrative and listening in relation to educational settings. Co-written with Rebecca Adami. Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 49, Issue 1, 2015.

VOICES FROM THE PAST: ON REPRESENTATIONS OF SUFFERING IN EDUCATION

How can the use of testimonies, as representations of suffering, be understood in education? In this article I discuss what kind of potential the use of testimonies can have for pedagogical transformation, drawing on Mollenhauer, Sontag, Agamben and Spivak. Ethics and Education, Volume 10, Issue 2, 2015.